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Interpreting for people with learning disadvantages

Last year, I interpreted in a case with four defendants charged with counts contrary to Section 18 A. Just before their PTPH, a duty barrister and I got down to meet “my” defendant in the court’s custody so the barrister could talk with him. We had not much time, maybe twenty minutes all together to get back to a courtroom.  Continue reading “Interpreting for people with learning disadvantages”

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To be or not to be an Interpreter in the Court?

Over the last several months, I interpreted in 100 kg of illegally imported heroine case, for a person who was dying, for a woman in labour, and in a murder case that ended up with a life prison sentence. I am now writing these words not as an Interpreter but as a Behavioural Specialist and Development Trainer.  Continue reading “To be or not to be an Interpreter in the Court?”

Would the Damocles sword over a drunk driver’s head work?

When we consider a social approach to the law, we would distinguish two main groups of people. The first one is the group of people whose mindsets simply are not prone to break the law. This kind of mindset allows them always to choose behaviour that is socially approved, accepted, and recognised as lawful.  Continue reading “Would the Damocles sword over a drunk driver’s head work?”